PhD Students

Stefan Woehlke

First Name: 
Stefan
Last Name: 
Woehlke
Areas of Interest: 
Heritage, Diaspora Theory, Post-Emancipation Studies

memankel

First Name: 
Magda
Last Name: 
Mankel
Magda Mankel
Contact Information
Email: 
memankel@umd.edu
Bio Summary: 

I'm originally from the border town of Nogales, but I call Tucson, Arizona my home. I completed my undergraduate career at the University of Arizona where I received a B.A. in Anthropology. I'm a Ronald E. McNair scholar. My past research experiences include exploring migrant material culture and clandestine migration in southern Arizona through archeological fieldwork with the Undocumented Migration Project and semi-structured interviews with southern Arizona residents. I have also contributed to a project concerning the traditional cultural properties of the Tohono O’odham Nation. 

Areas of Interest: 
The ethnography of archaeology, cultural landscapes, heritage, migration, contemporary and historical archaeology.
Educational Background
Educational Background
Degree Type: 
BA
Degree Details: 
University of Arizona
Faculty Advisors

smp23

First Name: 
Soren
Last Name: 
Peterson
Soren hiking in a far away place
Contact Information
Room and Building: 
1101 Woods Hall
Email: 
smp23@umd.edu
Bio Summary: 

I am a bilingual (Spanish/English) international educator and applied anthropologist with academic interests in transnational migration, tourism, and the cultural anthropology and human geography of Latin America and the Caribbean. In addition to pursuing a PhD in Anthropology with a focus on Latin American transnational migration, I also serve as the Coordinator of Short-Term Programs in Education Abroad. I earned a Master of Arts in Anthropology from the University of Denver, where I used the anthropology of tourism and acculturation as theoretical frameworks for conducting ethnographic research on the sociocultural and economic impacts of education abroad programs on host families in Cuenca, Ecuador.
 
I am a member of the American Anthropological Association (AAA), Society for Applied Anthropology (SfAA), Washington Association of Professional Anthropologists (WAPA), High Plains Society for Applied Anthropology (HPSfAA), Latin American Studies Association (LASA), NAFSA: Association of International Educators, The Forum on Education Abroad, and the Association of Academic Programs in Latin America and the Caribbean (AAPLAC).
 

Areas of Interest: 
Transnational migration
Educational Background
Educational Background
Degree Type: 
MA
Degree Details: 
Anthropology (University of Denver)
Degree Type: 
BA
Degree Details: 
Geography (Augustana College, Illinois)
Research
Research: 

Within the broad area of undocumented immigration to the USA, I am interested in educational achievement, a key public issue associated with upward social mobility and assimilation into US culture. In particular, I work with Latin American youth in suburban Washington, DC to explore access to higher education through legislation such as the Maryland DREAM Act and federal initiatives such as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA).

Faculty Advisors
Academic Advisor
Service
Service Listing
Service: 
Volunteer at CASA de Maryland

vcw

First Name: 
Camille
Last Name: 
Westmont
Westmont
Contact Information
Email: 
vcw@umd.edu
Bio Summary: 

Historical Archaeology, Labor Archaeology, Women's Wage Labor, Public Archaeology

Educational Background
Educational Background
Degree Type: 
BA
Degree Details: 
Anthropology and Political Science, University of Kentucky, 2013
Faculty Advisors

Kevin S. Gibbons

First Name: 
Kevin
Last Name: 
Gibbons
Gibbons
Contact Information
Room and Building: 
B0104 Taliaferro Hall
Email: 
gibbonsk@umd.edu
Office Hours: 
Thursdays, 3:30-4:45 in Woods 0124C
Curriculum Vitae: 
Bio Summary: 

As a zooarchaeologist, my research focuses on analyzing and interpreting vertebrate and invertebrate animal remains from archaeological sites to further investigate relationships between human activities, economies, and the environment throughout history. Current and future research is focused on excavating at early sites in Iceland within the framework of the North Atlantic Biocultural Organisation to develop new data and techniques to understand human reactions to short- and medium-term environmental changes. 
In past research, I have specifically focused on animal use and husbandry during the the early colonial period in the Southeastern and Middle Atlantic United States. Past projects have focused on middling farmsteads and enslaved African quarters in rural northern Virginia during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and investigations of animal remains from an early French colonial plantation on the Gulf coast of Mississippi to determine changes in animal use by the occupants through successive French, British, and Spanish colonial and early American periods.

 

 

Areas of Interest: 
zooarchaeology, environmental archaeology, archaeology of global change, historic archaeology, human-environment interactions in colonial contexts.
Educational Background
Educational Background
Degree Type: 
BA
Degree Details: 
Anthropology, University of Georgia, Athens, 2009
Degree Type: 
MS
Degree Details: 
Environmental Archaeology & Palaeoeconomy, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK, 2010
Research
Research: 

Reitz, Elizabeth J., Kevin S. Gibbons, and Maran E. Little
In press.     Animal Remains from La Pointe-Krebs Plantation. In Archaeology at La Pointe-Krebs Plantation in Old Spanish Fort Park (22JA526), Pascagoula, Jackson County, Mississippi, edited by Gums, Bonnie L. and Gregory A. Waselkov. Center for Archaeological Studies at the University of South Alabama. Report prepared for the Mississippi Department of Archives and History, Jackson.
 
Gibbons, Kevin S.
2013     Analysis of Faunal Remains from the Accotink Quarter (44FX0223). In The Accotink Quarter: Archeological Data Recovery at Site 44FX0223, Fairfax County, Virginia, prepared by Sipe, Boyd, Craig Rose, and Jeremy Smith, pp. 919-978. Thunderbird Archeology. Submitted to D.R. Horton, Inc. Copies available from Thunderbird Archeology, a division of Wetland Studies and Solutions, Inc., Gainesville.
 
2013     Analysis of Macrobotanical Remains from the Accotink Quarter (44FX0223). In The Accotink Quarter: Archeological Data Recovery at Site 44FX0223, Fairfax County, Virginia, prepared by Sipe, Boyd, Craig Rose, and Jeremy Smith, pp. 979-995. Thunderbird Archeology. Submitted to D.R. Horton, Inc. Copies available from Thunderbird Archeology, a division of Wetland Studies and Solutions, Inc., Gainesville
 
2012     The Faunal Evidence from the Accotink Quarter (44FX0223): Beef and Pork in Slave Diets on Satellite Farms in the Chesapeake. Paper presented at the Thunderbird Archeology Symposium of Current Archeological Research and Public Outreach in the Potomac Region, Gainesville.
 
2012     Faunal Analysis of Site 44LD1125. In Site 44LD1125, Loudoun County, Virginia. Phase III Data Recovery Excavations, prepared by Rose, Craig and David Carroll, pp. 515-545. Thunderbird Archeology. Submitted to Toll Brothers, Inc. Copies available from Thunderbird Archeology, a division of Wetland Studies and Solutions, Inc., Gainesville.
 
2012     The Faunal Material from 44LD0729. In An Ordinary on the Potomac Path at Broad Run: Archeological Data Recovery at Site 44LD0729, Loudoun County, Virginia, prepared by Sipe, Boyd and Andrés Garzón-Oeschsle, pp. 373-389. Thunderbird Archeology. Submitted to NA Dulles Real Estate Investor LLC. Copies available from Thunderbird Archeology, a division of Wetland Studies and Solutions, Inc., Gainesville.
 
Gibbons, Kevin S. and Maran E. Little
2012     Faunal Remains from the La Pointe-Krebs House (22JA526): Comparing Colonial Gulf Coast Occupations with Data from the Atlantic Coast. Paper presented at the 45th Annual Conference on Historical and Underwater Archaeology, Baltimore.
 
Bigman, Daniel P., Stefan P. Brannan, Kevin S. Gibbons, Kelli Guest, Nathan Mountjoy, Benjamin M. Storey, and Stephen A. Kowalewski
2011     Theory in Recent Cultural Resource Management in Georgia. Early Georgia 39(1):27-52.
 
Gibbons, Kevin S.
2010     Hunting for Status: The Animal Bones from Conisbrough Castle and Cowick Manor, Yorkshire. Unpublished M.Sc. thesis, Department of Archaeology, University of Sheffield, Sheffield.
 
2009     Rural and Urban Diets in Colonial Charleston: A Comparative Analysis of Stono Plantation and the City of Charleston. Paper presented at the 86th Annual Meeting of the Georgia Academy of Science, Atlanta. 

Faculty Advisors
Academic Advisor
Courses Recently Taught
Course Name: 
ANTH222
Course Title: 
Introduction to Ecological and Evolutionary Anthropology
Service
Service Listing
Service: 
Practicing Anthropologist Student Association, President (2014)

Amanda Tang

First Name: 
Amanda
Last Name: 
Tang
Contact Information
Email: 
atang1@umd.edu
Areas of Interest: 
Historical Archaeology, Foodways, and Zooarchaeology
Faculty Advisors
Academic Advisor

Jeremy Trombley

First Name: 
Jeremy
Last Name: 
Trombley
Trombley
Contact Information
Email: 
jmtrom@umd.edu
Curriculum Vitae: 
Bio Summary: 

Jeremy Trombley is a Doctoral student in the University of Maryland Department of Anthropology.  He has done research on coal fired power in Western Kansas, Traditional Cultural Properties in Nevada, and invasive species in Maine and the Mid-Atlantic.  His areas of interest include environmental anthropology, science and technology studies, activist research methods, and post-constructivist theory.  He blogs at Struggle Forever!

Areas of Interest: 
Environmental Controversy, Science and Technology Studies, Ecological Theory, Activist Research Methods
Educational Background
Educational Background
Degree Type: 
BA
Degree Details: 
Anthropology - University of Kansas
Degree Type: 
MA
Degree Details: 
Master of Applied Anthropology - University of Maryland, College Park
Faculty Advisors
Academic Advisor

Elizabeth Van Dolah

First Name: 
Elizabeth
Last Name: 
Van Dolah
Van Dolah
Contact Information
Email: 
vandolah@umd.edu
Bio Summary: 

Elizabeth is a doctoral student at the University of Maryland studying environmental anthropology. After several years of working with Chesapeake environmental management programs, Elizabeth decided to pursue graduate studies in anthropology as a means to contribute to broadening understandings of the human dimensions of environmental issues. She is particularly interested in applied research that sits at the boundaries of interdisciplinary work and enhances community-based environmental management in coastal regions. Her research to date has focused on investigating the underlying socio-cultural and socio-political drivers and processes that affect community response to harmful algal blooms mitigation in the Chesapeake Bay region. For her doctoral research, she is interested in exploring the political ecology of ‘place’ construction, and understanding the implications of place-making processes on socio-ecological resilience.

Areas of Interest: 
Environmental anthropology, ecological anthropology, socio-ecological resilience, space and place, cultural landscapes, political ecology, visual anthropology, Chesapeake Bay, harmful algae, climate change
Educational Background
Educational Background
Degree Type: 
MA
Degree Details: 
Applied Anthropology, University of Maryland College Park
Degree Type: 
BA
Degree Details: 
Environmental Studies, Winthrop University
Degree Type: 
BA
Degree Details: 
Studio Art, Winthrop University
Faculty Advisors
Academic Advisor
Thesis or Dissertation Advisor

Benjamin A. Skolnik

First Name: 
Benjamin
Last Name: 
Skolnik
Skolnik
Contact Information
Room and Building: 
1124 Woods Hall
Phone: 
+1 (301) 405 1429
Email: 
bskolnik@umd.edu
Areas of Interest: 
Landscapes, Slavery, Heritage, GIS and LiDAR
Educational Background
Educational Background
Degree Type: 
MA
Degree Details: 
Applied Anthropology, University of Maryland, College Park, 2012
Degree Type: 
BA
Degree Details: 
Anthropology and History, College of William & Mary, 2007
Research
Research: 

I am interested in the archaeology of landscapes and the development of GIS techniques to identify and study landscapes through archaeology.  Specifically, I study plantation landscapes in the English colonies and early American states and the manner in which they functioned culturally.  By discovering the rules of garden design through archaeology and the ways in which they were experienced by the people within them, we can attempt to recreate not just these lost physical landscapes but also the cultural landscapes which stemmed from and further affected the physical landscape.

Faculty Advisors
Academic Advisor

Megan E. Springate

First Name: 
Megan
Last Name: 
Springate
Contact Information
Email: 
mes@umd.edu
Curriculum Vitae: 
Bio Summary: 

Selected Bibliography
 
Megan E. Springate (2012) Review of In the Shadow of Slavery: Africa's Botanical Legacy in the Atlantic World by Judith A. Carney and Richard N. Rosomoff (2009) University of California Press. African Diaspora Archaeology Network Newsletter, Spring.
 
Megan E. Springate (2011) Coffin Handles from the African Burial Ground, New York City: Notes on Their Source and Context. African Diaspora Archaeology Newsletter, June 2011.
 
Megan E. Springate (2011) A Concealed Shoe Recovered at the Updike Farmstead, Princeton Township, Mercer County, New Jersey. Newsletter of the Archaeological Society of New Jersey No. 232, May.
 
Megan E. Springate (2010) Squatters Budgeree: Pipes for the Australian Market Recovered at the Homestead of a Free Black Family in Sussex County, NJ. African Diaspora Archaeology Newsletter, March 2010.
 
Megan E. Springate (1997) Cellulose Nitrate Plastic (Celluloid) in Archaeological Assemblages: Identification and Conservation. Northeast Historical Archaeology 26: 63-72.
 
Megan E. Springate (1997)  Some Brief Notes on the Tobacco Tag. Arch Notes NS 2(6): 10-12
 
 
Selected Conference Papers
 
Megan E. Springate (2013) Reform and Archaeology. Society for Historical Archaeology, Leicester, UK, Jan. [accepted]
 
Hilda Maclean and Megan E. Springate (2013) Death at the Edge of Empire and Beyond: The Divergent Histories of Coffin Furniture and Coffin Hardware. Society for Historical Archaeology, Leicester, UK, Jan. [accepted]
 
Megan E. Springate (2012) Girl Guests and The Spirit of God in Woman: Retreat and Reform at Wiawaka Holiday House, Lake George, New York. Conference on New York State History, June.
 
Megan E. Springate and Amy Raes (2012) The Power of Choice: Reflections of Economic Ability, Status, and Ethnicity in the Foodways of a Free Black Family in Northwestern NJ. Society for American Archaeology, Memphis, TN, Apr.
 
Megan E. Springate (2012) Labor, Leisure, and Control: Wiawaka Holiday House as a Progressive Era Heterotopia. AnthroPlus, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, Mar.
 
Megan E. Springate (2011) Where the Tinder Was Lit: Archaeological Excavations at the Wesleyan Chapel, Seneca Falls, NY. Council for Northeast Historical Archaeology, Utica, NY, Oct.
 
Megan E. Springate (2011) Early Settlement at Bombay Hook, Kent County, Delaware. 4th Annual Symposium on the Early Colonial Archaeology of the Delaware Valley Sponsored by the Delaware SHPO, New Castle, DE, May.
 
Megan E. Springate (2008) Material Culture of the 17th Century Swedish Settlers. The 17th Century in the Delaware Valley: An Archaeological Symposium Sponsored by the Delaware SHPO, New Castle, DE, May.
 
Megan E. Springate (2007) Documenting the Wooden Stick Lighter/Deck Scow MARICOPA: A Vestige of the Lighterage Era in the Port of NY. Society for Historical Archaeology, Williamsburg, VA, Jan.
 
Megan E. Springate (2003) Panel Discussion, Archaeology of a NJ Tavern Site. Piety, Politics and Public Houses: Churches, Taverns and Revolution in NJ New Jersey State Museum, Trenton, NJ, March.
 
Megan E. Springate, Carole Sinclair-Smith and Katrina Richter (2003) Minors in the Tavern: Helping Kids Dig Into History. Association for Living History, Farm and Agricultural Museums, Williamsburg, VA. June.
 
Megan E. Springate (2002) Observations on the Aboriginal Remains in Eastern NJ: The Notebook of Charles F. Woolley, 1878-1881. Eastern States Archaeological Federation, Mt. Laurel, NJ, Nov.
 

Areas of Interest: 
Historical Archaeology, Capitalism, Class, Gender, Social Reform, Tourism/leisure, and Uses of the Past in the Present
Faculty Advisors
Academic Advisor